Neuroscience

Stereotypes prejudice our musical tastes

Music prompts strong emotional responses. But it turns out it's not just the sound, or even the lyrics, that control the emotions we experience.

Neuroscience

Your favorite music can send your brain into a pleasure overload

We all know that moment when we're in the car, at a concert or even sitting on our sofa and one of our favorite songs is played. It's the one that has that really good chord in it, flooding your system with pleasurable emotions, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Dutch government holds off on new lockdown measures, for now

The Netherlands' current partial lockdown, introduced two weeks ago amid sharply rising coronavirus infections, will likely remain in place until December, the Dutch prime minister and health minister said Tuesday, but they ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

War songs and lullabies behind origins of music

Love is not the reason why we sing and create symphonies—at least not the primary reason, according to a new evolutionary theory of the origins of music.

Psychology & Psychiatry

A fraction of a second is all you need to feel the music

The brain does not necessarily perceive the sounds in music simultaneously as they are being played. New research sheds light on musicians' implicit knowledge of sound and timing.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

New evidence-based guidelines on music for people with dementia

Researchers from Western Sydney University's MARCS Institute for Brain, Behavior and Development have published a new research paper and recommended guidelines for music use for people with dementia after a successful trial ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why you should learn a musical instrument

Whether it's rocking out on a drum kit or joining a choir, everyone can benefit from learning music. But the benefits of learning music at any age are not necessarily what first comes to mind, says Dr. Paul Evans from UNSW ...

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Music

Music is an art form whose medium is sound. Common elements of music are pitch (which governs melody and harmony), rhythm (and its associated concepts tempo, meter, and articulation), dynamics, and the sonic qualities of timbre and texture. The word derives from Greek μουσική (mousike), "(art) of the Muses".

The creation, performance, significance, and even the definition of music vary according to culture and social context. Music ranges from strictly organized compositions (and their recreation in performance), through improvisational music to aleatoric forms. Music can be divided into genres and subgenres, although the dividing lines and relationships between music genres are often subtle, sometimes open to individual interpretation, and occasionally controversial. Within "the arts", music may be classified as a performing art, a fine art, and auditory art.

To many people in many cultures music is an important part of their way of life. Greek philosophers and ancient Indian philosophers defined music as tones ordered horizontally as melodies and vertically as harmonies. Common sayings such as "the harmony of the spheres" and "it is music to my ears" point to the notion that music is often ordered and pleasant to listen to. However, 20th-century composer John Cage thought that any sound can be music, saying, for example, "There is no noise, only sound." According to musicologist Jean-Jacques Nattiez, "the border between music and noise is always culturally defined—which implies that, even within a single society, this border does not always pass through the same place; in short, there is rarely a consensus.... By all accounts there is no single and intercultural universal concept defining what music might be, except that it is 'sound through time'."

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA