Neuroscience

Professor studies how jazz improvisation affects the brain

Jazz artist Louis Armstrong once said, "never play a thing the same way twice." Although musical improvisation—composing new passages on the spot—is not unique to jazz, it's perhaps the genre's most defining element. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

What your musical taste says about your personality

We're exposed to music for nearly 20% of our waking lives. But much of our musical experience seems to be a mystery. Why does some music bring us to tears while other pieces make us dance? Why is it that the music that we ...

Pediatrics

Singing calms baby longer than talking

In a new study from the University of Montreal, infants remained calm twice as long when listening to a song, which they didn't even know, as they did when listening to speech. "Many studies have looked at how singing and ...

Neuroscience

Sharp or flat: Gene clues into musical ability

Music surfaces frequently in the great Nature vs. Nurture debate: Why can someone be a virtuoso pianist yet their neighbour be a musical duffer? Does the answer lie in genes or upbringing?

Psychology & Psychiatry

Are kids who take music lessons different from other kids?

(Medical Xpress)—Research by U of T Mississauga psychology professor Glenn Schellenberg reveals that two key personality traits – openness-to-experience and conscientiousness—predict better than IQ who will take music ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Musical aptitude relates to reading ability

Auditory working memory and attention, for example the ability to hear and then remember instructions while completing a task, are a necessary part of musical ability. But musical ability is also related to verbal memory ...

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