Psychology & Psychiatry

Five ways to manage your doomscrolling habit

Doomscrolling, according to Merriam-Webster, is "the tendency to continue to surf or scroll through bad news, even though that news is saddening, disheartening, or depressing." For many it's a habit born of the pandemic—and ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New turning point? More countries easing COVID restrictions

Late-night disco partying. Elbow-to-elbow seating in movie theaters. Mask-free bearing of faces in public, especially in Europe and North America: Bit by bit, many countries that have been hard-hit by the coronavirus are ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Excessive media exposure to traumatic events could harm kids

FIU scientists investigating the effects of hurricanes and other natural disasters on children's brain development previously found that increased exposure to media coverage of disasters led kids to have post-traumatic stress ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How a natural disaster can bring couples closer

Although natural disasters can cause horrific damage to homes and infrastructure, they can bring married couples closer together, at least temporarily. That's according to a first-of-its-kind study from researchers at The ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Digital CBT effective for severe trauma

Traumatic experiences such as assault or a road accident can give rise to nightmares, flashbacks and other mental reactions, and accessible therapy is needed to prevent exacerbation of the problems. Researchers at Karolinska ...

page 1 from 18

Natural disaster

A natural disaster is the effect of a natural hazard (e.g. flood, volcanic eruption, earthquake, or landslide) that affects the environment, and leads to financial, environmental and/or human losses. The resulting loss depends on the capacity of the population to support or resist the disaster, and their resilience. This understanding is concentrated in the formulation: "disasters occur when hazards meet vulnerability." A natural hazard will hence never result in a natural disaster in areas without vulnerability, e.g. strong earthquakes in uninhabited areas. The term natural has consequently been disputed because the events simply are not hazards or disasters without human involvement.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA