Obstetrics & gynaecology

Reducing the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in IVF

The world's first IVF baby, Louise Brown born in England in 1978, was conceived from a naturally developing follicle in her mother's ovary. However, as other groups around the world would quickly discover, the "natural cycle" ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study reveals the job problems contributing to physician suicide

Physician burnout and suicide are a growing public health concern, with 1 in 15 physicians experiencing suicidal ideation. Studies consistently show that physicians are more likely than non-physicians to experience work-related ...

Oncology & Cancer

13 special genes linked to epigenetic changes in cancer samples

Reducing the burden of cancer in individuals and society is a major area of concern globally. In Norway, by the end of 2020, 35,515 people were newly diagnosed with cancer and more than 300,000 people were already living ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New mechanism in CD47 blockade treatment in HCC

China has the highest morbidity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the world. For HCC patients in early stage disease, surgical resection is the best treatment strategy, but most patients in advanced stages lose the opportunity ...

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Nature

Nature, in the broadest sense, is equivalent to the natural world, physical world, or material world. "Nature" refers to the phenomena of the physical world, and also to life in general. It ranges in scale from the subatomic to the cosmic.

The word nature is derived from the Latin word natura, or "essential qualities, innate disposition", and in ancient times, literally meant "birth". Natura was a Latin translation of the Greek word physis (φύσις), which originally related to the intrinsic characteristics that plants, animals, and other features of the world develop of their own accord. The concept of nature as a whole, the physical universe, is one of several expansions of the original notion; it began with certain core applications of the word φύσις by pre-Socratic philosophers, and has steadily gained currency ever since. This usage was confirmed during the advent of modern scientific method in the last several centuries.

Within the various uses of the word today, "nature" often refers to geology and wildlife. Nature may refer to the general realm of various types of living plants and animals, and in some cases to the processes associated with inanimate objects – the way that particular types of things exist and change of their own accord, such as the weather and geology of the Earth, and the matter and energy of which all these things are composed. It is often taken to mean the "natural environment" or wilderness–wild animals, rocks, forest, beaches, and in general those things that have not been substantially altered by human intervention, or which persist despite human intervention. For, example, manufactured objects and human interaction generally are not considered part of nature, unless qualified as, for example, "human nature" or "the whole of nature". This more traditional concept of natural things which can still be found today implies a distinction between the natural and the artificial, with the artificial being understood as that which has been brought into being by a human consciousness or a human mind. Depending on the particular context, the term "natural" might also be distinguished from the unnatural, the supernatural, or synthetic.

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