Oncology & Cancer

Burden of myeloproliferative neoplasms in Australia revealed

New research led by Cancer Council Queensland and Curtin University has investigated the patterns and trends of a rare group of blood cancers known as myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) for the first time in Australia.

Medical research

Vitamin D and immune cells stimulate bone marrow disease

The bone marrow disease myelofibrosis is stimulated by excessive signaling from vitamin D and immune cells known as macrophages, reveals a Japanese research team. These findings could help to develop alternative treatments ...

Health

Vietnam veterans and agent orange exposure—new report

The latest in a series of congressionally mandated biennial reviews of the evidence of health problems that may be linked to exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides used during the Vietnam War found sufficient evidence ...

Oncology & Cancer

JAK inhibitors associated with aggressive lymphoma

Austrian researchers have discovered that a small number of patients taking targeted drugs known as Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors to treat myelofibrosis may develop aggressive lymphomas.

Cardiology

Increased risk of thrombosis in myeloproliferative neoplasms

(HealthDay)—Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have increased risk of arterial thrombosis and venous thrombosis across all age groups and MPN subtypes, according to a study published online Jan. 16 in the ...

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Neoplasm

Neoplasm is an abnormal mass of tissue as a result of neoplasia. Neoplasia ("new growth" in Greek) is the abnormal proliferation of cells. The growth of neoplastic cells exceeds and is not coordinated with that of the normal tissues around it. The growth persists in the same excessive manner even after cessation of the stimuli. It usually causes a lump or tumor. Neoplasms may be benign, pre-malignant (carcinoma in situ) or malignant (cancer).

In modern medicine, the term tumor means a neoplasm that has formed a lump. In the past, the term tumor was used differently. Some neoplasms do not cause a lump.

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