Neuroscience

First step to induce self-repair in the central nervous system

Damaged peripheral nerves can regenerate after an injury, for example, following a forearm fracture. Axons, the long projections of neurons that transmit stimuli or signals to other cells, are affected in the case of injury ...

Medications

One step closer to chronic pain relief

Sortilin, which is a protein expressed on the surface of nerve cells, plays a crucial role in pain development in laboratory mice—and in all likelihood in humans as well. This is the main conclusion of the study "Sortilin ...

Neuroscience

Device to improve walking in neuropathy patients hits market

After years of development, a Minnesota-designed sensory prosthesis intended to improve walking abilities in patients with little to no feeling in their legs is hitting the commercial market, starting with patients who are ...

Medical research

Students restore motion to five-year-old boy's arms

His arms paralyzed by a rare virus three years ago, Max Ng has struggled to push, pull and poke his way through the world with the gleeful ease that most 5 year olds enjoy.

Medical research

More evidence that blood tests can detect the risk of Alzheimer's

A new study confirms that a simple blood test can reveal whether there is accelerating nerve cell damage in the brain. The researchers analysed neurofilament light protein (NFL) in blood samples from patients with Alzheimer's ...

Neuroscience

Healthy fats improve nerve function in obese mice

Swapping dietary saturated fats for monounsaturated fats reverses nerve damage and restores nerve function in male mice, finds new preclinical research published in JNeurosci. These data support further investigation of diets ...

Neuroscience

Listening in to brain communications, without surgery

Plenty of legitimate science – plus a whole lot of science fiction – discusses ways to "hack the brain." What that really means, most of the time – even in the fictional examples – involves surgery, opening the skull ...

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Nerve injury

There is no single classification system that can describe all the many variations of nerve injury. Most systems attempt to correlate the degree of injury with symptoms, pathology and prognosis. In 1943, Seddon introduced a classification of nerve injuries based on three main types of nerve fiber injury and whether there is continuity of the nerve. The three types are : neurapraxia, axonotmesis and neurotmesis.

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