Vaccination

Third US vaccine could raise question: Which shots are best?

The nation is poised to get a third vaccine against COVID-19, but because at first glance the Johnson & Johnson shot may not be seen as equal to other options, health officials are girding for the question: Which one is best?

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

As hospital numbers fall, fatigued staff get relief at last

When COVID-19 patients inundated St. Louis hospitals, respiratory therapists arriving for yet another grueling shift with a dwindling supply of ventilators would often glance at their assignments and cry, heading into the ...

Vaccination

Meet the vaccine appointment bots, and their foe

Having trouble scoring a COVID-19 vaccine appointment? You're not alone. To cope, some people are turning to bots that scan overwhelmed websites and send alerts on social media when slots open up.

Vaccination

EU leaders study jab roll-out, vaccine certificates

EU leaders met virtually Thursday under pressure to speed up Europe's coronavirus vaccine rollout and facing demands from some capitals for a continent-wide vaccine passport.

Vaccination

FDA review reveals J&J COVID-19 vaccine safe, effective

A single-shot COVID-19 vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson completely prevented hospitalizations and deaths in a large clinical trial, according to the results of a new review released Wednesday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Health

States rush to catch up on delayed vaccines, expand access

A giant vaccination center is opening in Houston to administer 126,000 coronavirus doses in the next three weeks. Nevada health officials are working overtime to distribute delayed shots. And Rhode Island is rescheduling ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Guinea launches Ebola vaccination campaign

Guinea launched an Ebola vaccination campaign on Tuesday after a fresh outbreak of the deadly disease struck the country this month, with officials hoping to eradicate the virus in six weeks.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Guatemalans outraged by fake COVID-19 tests

Lawmakers and rights official in Guatemala called Monday for an investigation into 30,000 fake COVID-19 tests that were bought by public health officials.

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Official

An official is someone who holds an office (function or mandate, regardless whether it carries an actual working space with it) in an organization or government and participates in the exercise of authority (either his own or that of his superior and/or employer, public or legally private).

A government official or functionary is an official who is involved in public administration or government, through either election, appointment, selection, or employment. A bureaucrat is a member of the bureaucracy. An elected official is a person who is an official by virtue of an election. Officials may also be appointed ex officio (by virtue of another office, often in a specified capacity, such as presiding, advisory, secretary). Some official positions may be inherited.

A person who currently holds an office is referred to as an incumbent.

The word official as a noun has been recorded since the Middle English period, first seen in 1314.[citation needed] It comes from the Old French official (12th century), from the Latin officialis ("attendant to a magistrate, public official"), the noun use of the original adjective officialis ("of or belonging to duty, service, or office") from officium ("office"). The meaning "person in charge of some public work or duty" was first recorded in 1555. The adjective is first attested in English in 1533, via the Old French oficial.

The informal term officialese, the jargon of "officialdom", was first recorded in 1884.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA