Genetics

Parental diet affects sperm and health of future offspring

When parents eat low-protein or high-fat diets, it can lead to metabolic disorders in their adult offspring. Now, an international team led by researchers at the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research (CPR) has identified ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Low maternal vitamin D may raise risk for ADHD in offspring

(HealthDay)—There is an association between low maternal vitamin D during early pregnancy and an elevated risk for offspring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study recently published in the ...

Medical research

Cellular stress makes obese mothers have obese babies

Maternal obesity increases the risk for obesity and metabolic perturbations in their offspring, but what are the mechanisms? In a new study published March 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Sebastien Bouret of the ...

Medical research

What opioid use in rats can tell us about addiction in humans

In 2018, more than 47,000 Americans died from an opioid overdose, and ten million misused prescription opioids. The highly addictive drugs have destroyed lives and families, regardless of income level, race, age, or gender.

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Offspring

In biology, offspring is the product of reproduction, a new organism produced by one or more parents.

Collective offspring may be known as a brood or progeny in a more general way. This can refer to a set of simultaneous offspring, such as the chicks hatched from one clutch of eggs, or to all the offspring, as with the honeybee.

Human offspring (descendants) are referred to as children (without reference to age, thus one can refer to a parent's "minor children" or "adult children"); male children are sons and female children are daughters. See kinship and descent.

The word "fetus" is derived from the Latin word for "offspring." In humans, the fetal stage begins eight weeks after conception, when all of the major organs have been formed.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA