Oncology & Cancer

CDC: 2009 to 2017 saw increase in oral cavity, pharynx cancers

(HealthDay)—From 2007 to 2016, the incidence of cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx combined increased, according to research published in the April 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity ...

Cardiology

Brush your way to heart health

Poor oral health has been debated as a possible cause of heart disease for many years. Some research suggests that heart disease, clogged arteries and stroke might be linked to the inflammation and infections caused by oral ...

Medications

Sinuses bothering you? Use those nasal sprays regularly

Nasal saline and corticosteroid sprays are pretty standard treatment for individuals battling chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). They thin out thick mucus buildup and help ease the swelling in the nasal cavity that are the bane ...

Health

Cap your alcohol at 10 drinks a week: New draft guidelines

New draft alcohol guidelines, released today, recommend healthy Australian women and men drink no more than ten standard drinks a week and no more than four on any one day to reduce their risk of health problems.

Health

Alcohol and tobacco policies can reduce cancer deaths: study

Policies aimed at cutting alcohol and tobacco consumption, including the introduction of random breath testing programs and bans on cigarette advertising, have resulted in a significant reduction in Australian cancer death ...

Dentistry

Behavioral sciences in the promotion of oral health

2019 marks the Centennial of the Journal of Dental Research (JDR). Over the last century the JDR has been dedicated to the dissemination of new knowledge and information on all sciences relevant to dentistry and to the oral ...

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Mouth

The mouth, buccal cavity, or oral cavity is the first portion of the alimentary canal that receives food and begins digestion by mechanically breaking up the solid food particles into smaller pieces and mixing them with saliva. The oral mucosa is the mucous membrane epithelium lining the inside of the mouth.

In addition to its primary role as the beginning of the digestive system, in humans the mouth also plays a significant role in communication. While primary aspects of the voice are produced in the throat, the tongue, lips, and jaw are also needed to produce the range of sounds included in human language. Another non-digestive function of the mouth is its role in secondary social and/or sexual activity, such as kissing. The physical appearance of the mouth and lips play a part in defining sexual attractiveness.

The mouth is normally moist, and is lined with a mucous membrane. The lips mark the transition from mucous membrane to skin, which covers most of the body.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA