Oncology & Cancer

Researchers find a new therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer

The development of pancreatic cancer is driven by co-existing mutations in an oncogene involved in controlling cell growth, called KRAS, and in a tumor suppressor gene, called p53. But how these mutations cooperate to promote ...

Oncology & Cancer

Finding familiar pathways in kidney cancer

p53 is the most famous cancer gene, not least because it's involved in causing over 50% of all cancers. When a cell loses its p53 gene—when the gene becomes mutated—it unleashes many processes that lead to the uncontrolled ...

Oncology & Cancer

Genetically modified virus combats prostate cancer

Researchers at the São Paulo State Cancer Institute (ICESP) in Brazil have used a genetically manipulated virus to destroy tumor cells upon injection into mice with prostate cancer. The virus also made tumor cells more sensitive ...

Oncology & Cancer

Helping infants survive brain cancer

Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is a particularly challenging type of brain cancer. The tumor most commonly arises in infants under the age of one—who are too young to undergo radiation treatment. Only 40 percent of children ...

Oncology & Cancer

Team finds key to common cancer pathway

Scientists have long known that the protein p53, when mutated, is a critical factor in the onset of many different kinds of cancer. In its unmutated form, however, it is known to protect against cancer.

Oncology & Cancer

Fatal brake failures: Tumorigenesis in the colon

Two genes normally work together to suppress the development of colon cancer. Their combined loss favors tumorigenesis and stimulates the formation of metastases.

Genetics

How some heart cells cope with high blood pressure

Individual cells within the same heart cope differently with high blood pressure, according to a study in human cells and mice by a team of cardiologists and computational biologists at the University of Tokyo. This is the ...

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P53

More reference expression data

p53 (also known as protein 53 or tumor protein 53), is a transcription factor which in humans is encoded by the TP53 gene. p53 is important in multicellular organisms, where it regulates the cell cycle and thus functions as a tumor suppressor that is involved in preventing cancer. As such, p53 has been described as "the guardian of the genome," "the guardian angel gene," and the "master watchman," referring to its role in conserving stability by preventing genome mutation.

The name p53 is in reference to its apparent molecular mass: it runs as a 53 kilodalton (kDa) protein on SDS-PAGE. But based on calculations from its amino acid residues, p53's mass is actually only 43.7kDa. This difference is due to the high number of proline residues in the protein which slow its migration on SDS-PAGE, thus making it appear heavier than it actually is. This effect is observed with p53 from a variety of species, including humans, rodents, frogs, and fish.

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