Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Hypertension drug may hold promise for Alzheimer's disease

Seeking new treatments to slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease, researchers found the blood pressure drug nilvadipine increased blood flow to the brain's memory and learning center among people with Alzheimer's disease ...

Health

Is coffee good for you?

If you love coffee but aren't really sure whether it's good for you, drink up—research suggests there are several ways coffee appears to boost our health beyond the buzz that keeps us energized enough to power through the ...

Neuroscience

Multiple brain regions moderate and link depressive mood and pain

Depression is linked to diminished activity in parts of the brain believed to regulate mood, which previous research suggests may explain why depressed persons display an lessened ability to govern their ruminative thought ...

Neuroscience

What's the right amount of 'zapping' in epilepsy laser surgery?

There is an estimated 2.4 million people diagnosed with epilepsy each year, according to the World Health Organization. Some types of epileptic seizure can be essentially cured by open surgery for patients who don't respond ...

Neuroscience

Brain stimulation reverses age-related memory loss

Stimulating a precise location of the brain's memory center with electromagnetic pulses improves the memory of older adults with age-related memory loss to the level of young adults, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.

Neuroscience

How the brain 'mentalizes' cooperation

What parts of your brain are involved in gauging a friend's actions and adjusting your own; for example, when you both carry a couch up a flight of stairs? Researchers in Japan have found that part of the right side of the ...

Neuroscience

Learning a second alphabet for a first language

A part of the brain that maps letters to sounds can acquire a second, visually distinct alphabet for the same language, according to a study of English speakers published in eNeuro. The research challenges theoretical constraints ...

Neuroscience

How the brain responds to texture

Our hands and fingertips are amazingly sensitive to texture. We can easily distinguish coarse sandpaper from smooth glass, but we also pick up more subtle differences across a wide range of textures, like the slick sheen ...

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