Medications

Testosterone nasal spray to treat anxiety disorders

A testosterone-containing nasal spray received its second U.S. patent and its first patent in Europe, making it the first testosterone therapy licensed to treat anxiety disorders.

Neuroscience

Renewed hope for treatment of pain and depression

Researchers at the Department of Infection and Immunity of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) have developed LIH383, a novel molecule that binds to and blocks a previously unknown opioid receptor in the brain, thereby ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Artificial nose shows potential to treat breathing disorders

A respiratory simulation device, complete with an artificial nose made from a 3-D printer, is the subject of Miami University's newest patent and a potential breakthrough in researching, diagnosing and treating breathing ...

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Patent

A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to an inventor or his assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for a disclosure of an invention.

The procedure for granting patents, the requirements placed on the patentee and the extent of the exclusive rights vary widely between countries according to national laws and international agreements. Typically, however, a patent application must include one or more claims defining the invention which must be new, inventive, and useful or industrially applicable. In many countries, certain subject areas are excluded from patents, such as business methods and mental acts. The exclusive right granted to a patentee in most countries is the right to prevent others from making, using, selling, or distributing the patented invention without permission.

Under the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, patents should be available in WTO member states for any inventions, in all fields of technology, and the term of protection available should be minimum twenty years. Different types of patents may have varying patent terms (i.e., durations).

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