Psychology & Psychiatry

Study unveils clue to the origin of dyslexia

Because dyslexia affects so many people around the world, countless studies have attempted to pinpoint the source of the learning disorder.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Linking reading to voice recognition

When people recognize voices, part of what helps make voice recognition accurate is noticing how people pronounce words differently. But individuals with dyslexia don't experience this familiar language advantage, say researchers.

Neuroscience

Why Henry Higgins could tell his barrow girl from his fair lady

When Professor Henry Higgins instructed Eliza Doolittle that it was "Ay not I, O not Ow, Don't say 'Rine,' say 'Rain'", he was drawing on years of experience as a professor of phonetics. But research funded by the Wellcome ...

Phonetics

Phonetics (from the Greek: φωνή, phōnē, "sound, voice") is a branch of linguistics that comprises the study of the sounds of human speech, or—in the case of sign languages—the equivalent aspects of sign. It is concerned with the physical properties of speech sounds or signs (phones): their physiological production, acoustic properties, auditory perception, and neurophysiological status. Phonology, on the other hand, is concerned with the abstract, grammatical characterization of systems of sounds or signs.

The field of phonetics is a multiple layered subject of linguistics that focuses on speech. In the case of oral languages there are three basic areas of study:

These areas are inter-connected through the common mechanism of sound, such as wavelength (pitch), amplitude, and harmonics.

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