Immunology

Still sneezing? Climate change may prolong allergy season

Every year, without fail, summer brings changes to our surroundings: more sunlight, heat, greenness and flowers, among many others. For some people, these changes also mean increasing physical discomfort because along with ...

Health

How climate change could make your allergies worse

Sprouting daffodils, magnolias, and cherry blossoms serve as cues to put away puffy coats and say goodbye to winter. But for more than 50 million Americans (myself included), the beautiful flowers also signal something else: ...

Immunology

Sniffles and sneezes: A Q&A about allergies with Dr. Ryan Steele

With allergy season upon us, YaleNews spoke to Dr. Ryan Steele, instructor of clinical medicine at Yale School of Medicine, about the current season, prevention, treatments, and other facts allergy sufferers need to know. ...

Neuroscience

A sleep-deprived brain interprets impressions negatively

A sleepless night not only leaves us fatigued and distracted, it also makes us interpret things more negatively and makes us more likely to lose our temper. Moreover, people suffering from a pollen allergy are at a high risk ...

Immunology

Could hacking the immune system cure allergies?

Scientists are redesigning natural allergens to help the immune system defend against them, in a move that could eliminate the side effects and lifelong medication of treating allergies—the most common chronic condition ...

Immunology

Cord blood clue to respiratory diseases

New research has found children born in the last three months of the year in Melbourne may have a greater risk of developing respiratory diseases such as asthma.

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Pollen

Pollen is a fine to coarse powder containing the microgametophytes of seed plants, which produce the male gametes (sperm cells). Pollen grains have a hard coat that protects the sperm cells during the process of their movement from the stamens to the pistil of flowering plants or from the male cone to the female cone of coniferous plants. When pollen lands on a compatible pistil or female cone (i.e., when pollination has occurred), it germinates and produces a pollen tube that transfers the sperm to the ovule (or female gametophyte). Individual pollen grains are small enough to require magnification to see detail.

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