Obstetrics & gynaecology

Further evidence of the dangers of smoking in pregnancy

Smoking during pregnancy is understood to pose risks to both baby and mother. Now, new research led by the University of Glasgow has found further evidence that maternal smoking poses a risk to baby and child health.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

First of its kind statistics on pregnant women in US prisons

In what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind systematic look at pregnancy frequency and outcomes among imprisoned U.S. women, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say almost 1,400 pregnant women were admitted to 22 U.S. ...

Cardiology

Pregnancy-adapted algorithm avoids diagnostic imaging for PE

(HealthDay)—A pregnancy-adapted algorithm can safely avoid diagnostic imaging in a proportion of pregnant women with suspected pulmonary embolism, according to a study published in the March 21 issue of the New England ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Does pregnancy history affect cognitive function?

Healthy cognitive aging is a public health priority, especially as the US population grows older. Until now, not much has been known about the link between pregnancy history and cognitive function in older women. A new study ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Breastfeeding can erase effects of prenatal violence for newborns

How infants adjust in their first months of life depends on many factors, including what their mothers experienced while they are in utero. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1 in 4 women in ...

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Pregnancy

Pregnancy (latin graviditas) is the carrying of one or more offspring, known as a fetus or embryo, inside the uterus of a female. In a pregnancy, there can be multiple gestations, as in the case of twins or triplets. Human pregnancy is the most studied of all mammalian pregnancies. Obstetrics is the surgical field that studies and cares for high risk pregnancy. Midwifery is the non-surgical field that cares for pregnancy and pregnant women.

Childbirth usually occurs about 38 weeks after conception; i.e., approximately 40 weeks from the last normal menstrual period (LNMP) in humans. The World Health Organization defines normal term for delivery as between 37 weeks and 42 weeks. The calculation of this date involves the assumption of a regular 28-day period.

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