Obstetrics & gynaecology

Point-of-care diagnostic for detecting preterm birth on horizon

A new study provides a first step toward the development of an inexpensive point-of-care diagnostic test to assess the presence of known risk factors for preterm birth in resource-poor areas. The study found that measuring ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Simple test predicts dangerous pregnancy disorder

Edith Cowan University researchers have developed a simple, low-cost way to predict preeclampsia, a potentially deadly condition that affects pregnant women.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Toxoplasmosis: Preventing mother-to-child transmission

Professor Maritza Jaramillo knows a thing or two about parasites—she has spent most of her life studying them. "During my bachelor's degree in Colombia, I did an internship at a lab specializing in parasitic infections. ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Study seeks to guide maternal weight gain in twin pregnancies

An old adage urges pregnant women to "eat for two." So with twins, is it "eat for three?" While that is likely bad advice, when it comes to twin pregnancies, clinicians don't have firm guidelines for ideal weight gain due ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Screening for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy not advised

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening for bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women who are not at increased risk for preterm delivery; for pregnant women at increased risk ...

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Pregnancy

Pregnancy (latin graviditas) is the carrying of one or more offspring, known as a fetus or embryo, inside the uterus of a female. In a pregnancy, there can be multiple gestations, as in the case of twins or triplets. Human pregnancy is the most studied of all mammalian pregnancies. Obstetrics is the surgical field that studies and cares for high risk pregnancy. Midwifery is the non-surgical field that cares for pregnancy and pregnant women.

Childbirth usually occurs about 38 weeks after conception; i.e., approximately 40 weeks from the last normal menstrual period (LNMP) in humans. The World Health Organization defines normal term for delivery as between 37 weeks and 42 weeks. The calculation of this date involves the assumption of a regular 28-day period.

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