Obstetrics & gynaecology

Greater risk for babies born during natural disasters

Pregnant women exposed to natural disasters such as volcanoes are more likely to give birth prematurely, according to a new study from The Australian National University (ANU).

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Diagnosing pregnancy complications by monitoring placental oxygen

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have developed a prototype device that could potentially diagnose pregnancy complications by monitoring the oxygen level of the placenta. The device sends near-infrared light ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

How a mother's data can help countless children

In Rhode Island, when pregnant women are ready to deliver their babies, 80% of them check in at Women & Infants in Providence, making it one of the largest obstetrical care hospitals in the country. If kids need urgent care, ...

page 1 from 40

Pregnancy

Pregnancy (latin graviditas) is the carrying of one or more offspring, known as a fetus or embryo, inside the uterus of a female. In a pregnancy, there can be multiple gestations, as in the case of twins or triplets. Human pregnancy is the most studied of all mammalian pregnancies. Obstetrics is the surgical field that studies and cares for high risk pregnancy. Midwifery is the non-surgical field that cares for pregnancy and pregnant women.

Childbirth usually occurs about 38 weeks after conception; i.e., approximately 40 weeks from the last normal menstrual period (LNMP) in humans. The World Health Organization defines normal term for delivery as between 37 weeks and 42 weeks. The calculation of this date involves the assumption of a regular 28-day period.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA