Medical research

Study examines why kidneys can't regenerate after birth

Tulane University researchers discovered a new mechanism that may explain why human kidneys, which are comprised of almost a million filter units, stop creating new filter cells after birth.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

The tiniest babies: Shifting the boundary of life earlier

Michelle Butler was just over halfway through her pregnancy when her water broke and contractions wracked her body. She couldn't escape a terrifying truth: Her twins were coming much too soon.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Providing a potential treatment option to infants where there is none

A little over 1% of babies born in the U.S. in 2020 fell under the category of very low birthweight, meaning they weighed less than 1,500 grams at birth, or less than 3 pounds, 4 ounces. And considering that the Centers ...

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Preterm birth

In humans, preterm birth refers to the birth of a baby of less than 37 weeks gestational age. Premature birth, commonly used as a synonym for preterm birth, refers to the birth of a premature infant. Because it is by far the most common cause of prematurity, preterm birth is the major cause of neonatal mortality in developed countries. Premature infants are at greater risk for short and long term complications, including disabilities and impediments in growth and mental development. Significant progress has been made in the care of premature infants, but not in reducing the prevalence of preterm birth. The cause for preterm birth is in many situations elusive and unknown; many factors appear to be associated with the development of preterm birth, making the reduction of preterm birth a challenging proposition.

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