Health

How to relieve itchy psoriasis

Skin issues can have a serious impact on your health and well-being. For the 7.5 million Americans living with psoriasis, itch can be the most bothersome part of their condition because it can make it difficult to sleep and ...

Immunology

Psoriasis tied to elevated risk for celiac disease

Individuals with psoriasis have double the odds of having celiac disease (CD) versus individuals without psoriasis, according to a research letter published online Feb. 9 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Psoriasis

Psoriasis (pronounced /səˈraɪəsɪs/) is a chronic, non-contagious autoimmune disease which affects the skin and joints. It commonly causes red scaly patches to appear on the skin. The scaly patches caused by psoriasis, called psoriatic plaques, are areas of inflammation and excessive skin production. Skin rapidly accumulates at these sites and takes on a silvery-white appearance. Plaques frequently occur on the skin of the elbows and knees, but can affect any area including the scalp and genitals. In contrast to eczema, psoriasis is more likely to be found on the extensor aspect of the joint.

The disorder is a chronic recurring condition which varies in severity from minor localized patches to complete body coverage. Fingernails and toenails are frequently affected (psoriatic nail dystrophy) and can be seen as an isolated finding. Psoriasis can also cause inflammation of the joints, which is known as psoriatic arthritis. Ten to fifteen percent of people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis.

The cause of psoriasis is not known, but it is believed to have a genetic component. Factors that may aggravate psoriasis include stress, withdrawal of systemic corticosteroid, excessive alcohol consumption, and smoking. There are many treatments available, but because of its chronic recurrent nature psoriasis is a challenge to treat.

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