Neuroscience

Seeing depression in the pupil

When people win or lose something, their pupils dilate slightly. Researchers have found that this dilation is less pronounced in acutely depressed patients than in healthy people. The more severely ill the patients were, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Blood biomarkers for detecting brain injury in COVID-19 patients

COVID-19 can directly cause neurologic symptoms and long-term neurological disease. Elevations of blood biomarkers indicative of brain injury have been reported in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of COVID-19 patients. Clinical ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Unhealthy drinking habits seen with some psychiatric disorders

(HealthDay)—Patients with anxiety disorder, depression, and bulimia nervosa who drink alcohol are likely to exceed recommended limits, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

COVID-19 triggers OCD in children and young people

Many children and young people with obsessive thoughts and compulsions experience that their OCD, anxiety and depressive symptoms worsen during a crisis such as COVID-19. This is shown by a new research result from Aarhus ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Happiness and the evolution of brain size

During human evolution, the size of the brain increased, especially in a particular part called the neocortex. The neocortex enables us to speak, dream and think. In search of the causes underlying neocortex expansion, researchers ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

'Brain fog' following COVID-19 recovery may indicate PTSD

A new report suggests that lingering "brain fog" and other neurological symptoms after COVID -19 recovery may be due to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an effect observed in past human coronavirus outbreaks such as ...

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Mental disorder

A mental disorder or mental illness is a psychological or behavioral pattern that occurs in an individual and is thought to cause distress or disability that is not expected as part of normal development or culture. The recognition and understanding of mental disorders has changed over time and across cultures. Definitions, assessments, and classifications of mental disorders can vary, but guideline criteria listed in the ICD, DSM and other manuals are widely accepted by mental health professionals. Categories of diagnoses in these schemes may include dissociative disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, eating disorders, developmental disorders, personality disorders, ambulatory disorders and many other categories. In many cases there is no single accepted or consistent cause of mental disorders, although they are often explained in terms of a diathesis-stress model and biopsychosocial model. Mental disorders have been found to be common, with over a third of people in most countries reporting sufficient criteria at some point in their life. Services for mental disorders may be based in hospitals or in the community. Mental health professionals diagnose individuals using different methodologies, often relying on case history and interview. Psychotherapy and psychiatric medication are two major treatment options, as well as supportive interventions and self-help. Treatment may be involuntary where legislation allows. Several movements campaign for changes to services and attitudes.

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