Oncology & Cancer

Technology shines the light on ovarian cancer treatments

Scientists estimate that nearly 60% of all cancer patients do not respond effectively to chemotherapy treatments. Even worse—many of those same patients experience toxic and sometimes deadly side effects.

Sleep apnea

Vital signs can now be monitored using radar

A radar system developed at the University of Waterloo can wirelessly monitor the vital signs of patients, eliminating the need to hook them up to any machines.

Oncology & Cancer

Molecular mechanisms behind AICAr drug; impact on ALL

AICAr (5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside, also called Acadesine) has been found to inhibit cell proliferation and has cytotoxic potential for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Much of the drug's cytotoxic ...

Oncology & Cancer

Typical mutations in children of soldiers at radar installations

Soldiers at radar installations who were exposed to high doses of radiation during their service passed on more genetic alterations to their children than families without radiation exposure. This has been demonstrated in ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Large-scale study of preventive antibiotic usage against Lyme disease

Today, at the start of the "Tick Week", the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) and Wageningen University are commencing a large-scale study to discover whether preventive use of antibiotics can ...

Oncology & Cancer

From genomic data to new cancer drug

New discoveries about follicular lymphoma, a currently intractable form of cancer, highlight the power of functional genomics in cancer gene discovery. A report in the Oct 28th issue of Cell demonstrates how genetic insights ...

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Radar

Radar is an object detection system that uses electromagnetic waves to identify the range, altitude, direction, or speed of both moving and fixed objects such as aircraft, ships, motor vehicles, weather formations, and terrain. The term RADAR was coined in 1941 as an acronym for radio detection and ranging. The term has since entered the English language as a standard word, radar, losing the capitalization. Radar was originally called RDF (Radio Direction Finder, now used as a totally different device) in the United Kingdom.

A radar system has a transmitter that emits microwaves or radio waves. These waves are in phase when emitted, and when they come into contact with an object are scattered in all directions. The signal is thus partly reflected back and it has a slight change of wavelength (and thus frequency) if the target is moving. The receiver is usually, but not always, in the same location as the transmitter. Although the signal returned is usually very weak, the signal can be amplified through use of electronic techniques in the receiver and in the antenna configuration. This enables radar to detect objects at ranges where other emissions, such as sound or visible light, would be too weak to detect. Radar is used in meteorological detection of precipitation, measuring ocean surface waves, air traffic control, police detection of speeding traffic, and by the military.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA