Medications

The pros and cons of radiotherapy: Will it work for you?

Women undergoing radiotherapy for many cancers are more likely than men to be cured, but the side effects are more brutal, according to one of Australia's most experienced radiation oncology medical physicists.

Oncology & Cancer

10-year outcomes similar for H-IMRT, C-IMRT in prostate cancer

(HealthDay)—For men with intermediate- and high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma, 10-year outcomes are similar with conventionally fractionated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (C-IMRT) or moderate hypofractionated IMRT ...

Oncology & Cancer

Melanoma is killing fewest Americans in decades

Advances in treatment have led to the largest yearly declines in deaths due to melanoma ever recorded for this skin cancer, results of a new study suggest.

Radiology & Imaging

Medical radiation exposure fell in the US from 2006 to 2016

Medical radiation exposure to patients in the U.S. fell by 20% between 2006 and 2016, reversing a quarter century-long trend of increasing exposure, according to a study appearing in the journal Radiology.

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Radiation

In physics, radiation describes any process in which energy emitted by one body travels through a medium or through space, ultimately to be absorbed by another body. Non-physicists often associate the word with ionizing radiation (e.g., as occurring in nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, and radioactive substances), but it can also refer to electromagnetic radiation (i.e., radio waves, infrared light, visible light, ultraviolet light, and X-rays) which can also be ionizing radiation, to acoustic radiation, or to other more obscure processes. What makes it radiation is that the energy radiates (i.e., it travels outward in straight lines in all directions) from the source. This geometry naturally leads to a system of measurements and physical units that are equally applicable to all types of radiation.

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