Oncology & Cancer

Cancer researchers discover new salivary gland

Researchers at the Netherlands Cancer Institute have discovered salivary glands in a previously unknown location. This is potentially great news for patients with head and neck tumors: Radiation oncologists will now be able ...

Oncology & Cancer

Pulmonary artery thrombosis a complication of radiation therapy

According to an article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), the imaging findings of in situ pulmonary artery thrombosis (PAT) associated with radiation therapy (RT) are different from those of acute pulmonary ...

Oncology & Cancer

New tools improve care for cancers that spread to the brain

Ambitious efforts at UVA Cancer Center to improve care delivered to patients with cancer that has spread to the brain have yielded important insights and tools that can benefit other hospitals, a new publication reports.

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Radiation

In physics, radiation describes any process in which energy emitted by one body travels through a medium or through space, ultimately to be absorbed by another body. Non-physicists often associate the word with ionizing radiation (e.g., as occurring in nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, and radioactive substances), but it can also refer to electromagnetic radiation (i.e., radio waves, infrared light, visible light, ultraviolet light, and X-rays) which can also be ionizing radiation, to acoustic radiation, or to other more obscure processes. What makes it radiation is that the energy radiates (i.e., it travels outward in straight lines in all directions) from the source. This geometry naturally leads to a system of measurements and physical units that are equally applicable to all types of radiation.

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