Neuroscience

The hemispheres are not equal: How the brain is not symmetrical

At first glance, the human body looks symmetrical: two arms, two legs, two eyes, two ears, even the nose and mouth appear to be mirrored on an imaginary axis dividing the faces of most people. And finally, the brain: it is ...

Medical research

Harmonic surprise found to be key to pop chart success

A combined team of researchers from Georgetown University and Secret Chord Laboratories has found that for a pop song to find success on the charts, it needs to have some degree of harmonic surprise. In their paper published ...

Neuroscience

Learning a new language recruits the right side of the brain

Learning a language later in life changes how the two halves of the brain contribute. As skills improve, language comprehension changes hemisphere specialization, but production does not, according to new research published ...

Neuroscience

Early neural activity associated with autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is rarely diagnosed until symptoms arise, often well into childhood. Evidence however, is mounting that developmental abnormalities likely emerge in the brain long before then: early identification ...

Neuroscience

How the brain controls our speech

Speaking requires both sides of the brain. Each hemisphere takes over a part of the complex task of forming sounds, modulating the voice and monitoring what has been said. However, the distribution of tasks is different than ...

Neuroscience

Researchers were not right about left brains

The left and right sides of the human brain are specialized for some cognitive abilities. For example, in humans, language is processed predominantly in the left hemisphere, and the right hand is controlled by the motor cortex ...

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