Psychology & Psychiatry

Train the brain to form good habits through repetition

You can hack your brain to form good habits – like going to the gym and eating healthily – simply by repeating actions until they stick, according to new psychological research involving the University of Warwick.

Neuroscience

Drugs of abuse: Identifying the addiction circuit

What happens in the brain of a compulsive drug user? What is the difference in brain function between an addict and a person who takes a drug in a controlled manner? In an attempt solve this puzzle, neurobiologists at the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

CDC: First U.S. case of rat-borne Andes virus diagnosed

(HealthDay)—The first confirmed U.S. case of a virus carried by South American rodents occurred earlier this year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

Neuroscience

Researchers repair acute spinal cord injury in monkeys

Spinal cord injuries are among the most severe and difficult-to-treat medical conditions, usually resulting in permanent disability including loss of muscle function, sensation and autonomic functions. Medical research is ...

Genetics

Researchers find novel genes for longevity in mammals

The genetic basis of lifespan determination is poorly understood. Most research has been done on short-lived animals, and it is unclear if these insights can be transferred to long-lived mammals like humans. By comparing ...

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Rodent

Sciuromorpha Castorimorpha Myomorpha Anomaluromorpha Hystricomorpha

Rodentia is an order of mammals also known as rodents, characterised by two continuously growing incisors in the upper and lower jaws which must be kept short by gnawing.

Forty percent of mammal species are rodents, and they are found in vast numbers on all continents other than Antarctica. Common rodents include mice, rats, squirrels, chipmunks, gophers, porcupines, beavers, hamsters, gerbils, guinea pigs, degus, chinchillas, prairie dogs, and groundhogs. Rodents have sharp incisors that they use to gnaw wood, break into food, and bite predators. Most eat seeds or plants, though some have more varied diets. Some species have historically been pests, eating seeds stored by people and spreading disease.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA