Psychology & Psychiatry

Research on mental health following environmental disasters soaring

New research led by the Yale School of Public Health finds that the number of studies on how environmental disasters affect mental health has increased dramatically and that they consistently find strong associations with ...

Health

Meaty issue: Mock pork edges onto Southeast Asian plates

A sprinkle of chili, some pinkish "pork" and a few basil leaves tossed into a sizzling wok—chef Songpol swears his vegan version of punchy Thai favourite pad kra phao is a match for the original, as plant-based protein ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Feeling depressed? Mahjong might be the answer

When it comes to boosting mental health among older Chinese, it might be as simple as a game of mahjong, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

Medications

Academics call for structured drug monitoring in care homes

Professor Sue Jordan from the University's College of Human and Health Sciences led the research which is newly published in the PLOS ONE journal. The study showed how care home residents' adverse side effects were picked ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study: Are kids hardwired for revenge?

Peter Blake, a Boston University associate professor of psychological and brain sciences and director of BU's Social Development and Learning Lab, set out to better understand how and when positive direct reciprocity—paying ...

Medical research

Using statistics to prevent the loss of blood donors

The Sanquin blood bank gathers data on every donation. Around 720,000 donations are made every year. "That generates a mountain of highly valuable data," says Leiden Ph.D. candidate Marieke Vinkenoog.

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Science

Science (from the Latin scientia, meaning "knowledge") refers to any systematic knowledge-base or prescriptive practice that is capable of resulting in a prediction or predictable type of outcome. In this sense, science may refer to a highly skilled technique or practice.

In its more restricted contemporary sense, science refers to a system of acquiring knowledge based on scientific method, and to the organized body of knowledge gained through such research. This article focuses on the more restricted use of the word. Science as discussed in this article is sometimes called experimental science to differentiate it from applied science—the application of scientific research to specific human needs—although the two are often interconnected.

Science is a continuing effort to discover and increase human knowledge and understanding through disciplined research. Using controlled methods, scientists collect observable evidence of natural or social phenomena, record measurable data relating to the observations, and analyze this information to construct theoretical explanations of how things work. The methods of scientific research include the generation of hypotheses about how phenomena work, and experimentation that tests these hypotheses under controlled conditions. Scientists are also expected to publish their information so other scientists can do similar experiments to double-check their conclusions. The results of this process enable better understanding of past events, and better ability to predict future events of the same kind as those that have been tested.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA