Psychology & Psychiatry

Are we wired for romance? fMRI imaging and genetic analysis say yes

If you've ever been a newlywed, you know the tingly euphoria of saying "I do" and starting a life with your spouse. This is romantic love, Western style. We often chalk it up to "chemistry," an ill-defined connection of hearts ...

Neuroscience

Mechanism behind upper motor degeneration revealed

Scientists from Northwestern Medicine and the University of Belgrade have pinpointed the electrophysiological mechanism behind upper motor neuron (UMN) disease, unlocking the door to potential treatments for amyotrophic lateral ...

Vaccination

Accelerating vaccine production with ceramic 3-D printing

Faced with the devastating effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, the world needs a vaccine, and needs it fast. However, the development of an effective vaccine requires a lot of time, effort and the highest safety standards that ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

New site helps data tell COVID-19 story in real time

There were rich sources of information on COVID-19 out there. But while all that data had plenty to say about the times we are living in, it still took Grace Yi and her colleagues to help tell its story.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

COVID-19: Tracking, data privacy and getting the numbers right

As plans for re-opening businesses, communities and schools emerge, it becomes increasingly important to better understand how many people are being infected and dying from COVID-19, and where and how the new coronavirus ...

Medical research

Molecular signatures can predict the efficacy of malaria vaccines

Molecular signatures before and after immunization can predict vaccine-induced protection, according to a study by ISGlobal. The study analysed the gene expression in peripheral blood cells from individuals immunized with ...

page 1 from 100

Science

Science (from the Latin scientia, meaning "knowledge") refers to any systematic knowledge-base or prescriptive practice that is capable of resulting in a prediction or predictable type of outcome. In this sense, science may refer to a highly skilled technique or practice.

In its more restricted contemporary sense, science refers to a system of acquiring knowledge based on scientific method, and to the organized body of knowledge gained through such research. This article focuses on the more restricted use of the word. Science as discussed in this article is sometimes called experimental science to differentiate it from applied science—the application of scientific research to specific human needs—although the two are often interconnected.

Science is a continuing effort to discover and increase human knowledge and understanding through disciplined research. Using controlled methods, scientists collect observable evidence of natural or social phenomena, record measurable data relating to the observations, and analyze this information to construct theoretical explanations of how things work. The methods of scientific research include the generation of hypotheses about how phenomena work, and experimentation that tests these hypotheses under controlled conditions. Scientists are also expected to publish their information so other scientists can do similar experiments to double-check their conclusions. The results of this process enable better understanding of past events, and better ability to predict future events of the same kind as those that have been tested.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA