Oncology & Cancer

Mammography unlikely to benefit older women with chronic illnesses

Regular screening mammograms are unlikely to benefit women 75 and older who have chronic illnesses such as cardiovascular disease or diabetes. New data suggest they would likely die due to other health conditions before they ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Updated Barrett's Guideline aims to improve patient outcomes

The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) has released its updated "ASGE guideline on screening and surveillance of Barrett's esophagus," published in the September issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Medical research

The test that could save the life of long-time smokers

A test called CT lung cancer screening could save the lives of tens of thousands of American smokers and former smokers every year, but only only 4% of those eligible are getting it.

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Screening

Screening, in general, is the investigation of a great number of something (for instance, people) looking for those with a particular problem or feature. One example is at an airport, where many bags get x-rayed to try to detect any which may contain weapons or explosives. People are also screened going through a metal detector. Even though the procedure aims at a large number of screens, it is always equivalent to sampling in statistics, because the complete population is almost always inaccessible for screening.

Screening has other, more specific meanings:

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