News tagged with single nucleotide polymorphisms

Related topics: genetic variation

What role do genome variations play in tuberculosis?

Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In 2016, this was the most common causative pathogen for death by infectious diseases. Therefore, investigating the biology of infection and disease development is important ...

Sep 07, 2017
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Single-nucleotide polymorphism

A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, pronounced snip) is a DNA sequence variation occurring when a single nucleotide — A, T, C, or G — in the genome (or other shared sequence) differs between members of a species (or between paired chromosomes in an individual). For example, two sequenced DNA fragments from different individuals, AAGCCTA to AAGCTTA, contain a difference in a single nucleotide. In this case we say that there are two alleles : C and T. Almost all common SNPs have only two alleles.

Within a population, SNPs can be assigned a minor allele frequency — the lowest allele frequency at a locus that is observed in a particular population. This is simply the lesser of the two allele frequencies for single-nucleotide polymorphisms[1]. There are variations between human populations, so a SNP allele that is common in one geographical or ethnic group may be much rarer in another.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

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