Oncology & Cancer

2012 to 2014 saw 41,185 U.S. patients with skin malignancy

From 2012 to 2014, 41,185 patients with a diagnosis of skin malignancy of the head and neck region were identified, mostly with a diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), according to a study recently published in the ...

Medical research

Linking wound healing and cancer risk

When our skin is damaged, a whole set of biological processes springs into action to heal the wound. Now, researchers from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research have shown that one of the molecules involved in this, ...

Oncology & Cancer

Biennial mammography screening yields more advanced-stage cancers

Cancers found in patients undergoing annual mammography screening are smaller and less advanced than those found in patients undergoing screenings every two years, according to a new study presented next week at the annual ...

Oncology & Cancer

Calquence approved to treat CLL, SLL

(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted supplemental approval to Calquence (acalabrutinib) for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), the agency announced ...

Oncology & Cancer

How much sunshine causes melanoma? It's in your genes

Australian researchers from QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute have shown that 22 different genes help to determine how much sun exposure a person needs to receive before developing melanoma.

Oncology & Cancer

Study finds 'hyperhotspots' that could predict skin cancer risk

New research by Yale University scientists reports the discovery of "hyperhotspots" in the human genome, locations that are up to 170-times more sensitive to ultraviolet radiation (UV) from sunlight compared to the genome ...

page 1 from 23

Skin cancer

Skin cancer is a malignant growth on the skin which can have many causes. The most common skin cancers are basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, and melanoma. Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), so a tumor is usually clearly visible. This makes most skin cancers detectable in the early stages. There are three common and likely types of skin cancer, each of which is named after the type of skin cell from which it arises. Unlike many other cancers, including those originating in the lung, pancreas, and stomach, only a small minority of those afflicted will actually die of the disease. Skin cancer represents the most commonly diagnosed cancer, surpassing lung, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. Melanoma is less common than basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, but it is the most serious—for example, in the UK there are 9,500 new cases of melanoma each year, and 2,300 deaths. More people now die of melanoma in the UK than in Australia. It is the most common cancer in the young population (20 – 39 age group). It is estimated that approximately 85% of cases are caused by too much sun.[citation needed] Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common skin cancers. The majority of these are called basal cell carcinomas. These are usually localised growths caused by excessive cumulative exposure to the sun and do not tend to spread.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA