Oncology & Cancer

The importance of a skin cancer check

Q: I turn 50 this year and at my annual physical, my doctor suggested I visit a dermatologist to check for melanoma. I have never had any suspicious moles or spots on my skin, so I've not had a skin check with a dermatologist ...

Oncology & Cancer

Decline in cancer diagnoses due to corona crisis

Cancer care has dramatically changed as a result of the measures taken during the COVID-19 pandemic: Many patients have not been going to their GPs, or putting it off, and have been referred to the hospital later. Consequently, ...

Surgery

Patients underestimate length of Mohs surgery scars

(HealthDay)—Scars from Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) for facial skin cancers are often longer than patients expect, according to a study published online March 11 in JAMA Network Open.

Oncology & Cancer

Melanoma is killing fewest Americans in decades

Advances in treatment have led to the largest yearly declines in deaths due to melanoma ever recorded for this skin cancer, results of a new study suggest.

Oncology & Cancer

Why throat cancers are on the rise, and why it matters to you

Who among us hasn't had a sore throat, a hoarse voice or a lump in the neck? Usually these are minor problems that go away on their own or after a course of antibiotics—but if they don't, check in with your doctor. These ...

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Skin cancer

Skin cancer is a malignant growth on the skin which can have many causes. The most common skin cancers are basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, and melanoma. Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), so a tumor is usually clearly visible. This makes most skin cancers detectable in the early stages. There are three common and likely types of skin cancer, each of which is named after the type of skin cell from which it arises. Unlike many other cancers, including those originating in the lung, pancreas, and stomach, only a small minority of those afflicted will actually die of the disease. Skin cancer represents the most commonly diagnosed cancer, surpassing lung, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. Melanoma is less common than basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, but it is the most serious—for example, in the UK there are 9,500 new cases of melanoma each year, and 2,300 deaths. More people now die of melanoma in the UK than in Australia. It is the most common cancer in the young population (20 – 39 age group). It is estimated that approximately 85% of cases are caused by too much sun.[citation needed] Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common skin cancers. The majority of these are called basal cell carcinomas. These are usually localised growths caused by excessive cumulative exposure to the sun and do not tend to spread.

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