Psychology & Psychiatry

Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain

Our actions are driven by "internal states" such as anxiety, stress or thirst—which will strongly affect and motivate our behaviors. Not much is known about how such states are represented by complex brain-wide circuits, ...

Neuroscience

'Mindreading' neurons simulate decisions of social partners

Scientists have identified special types of brain cells that may allow us to simulate the decision-making processes of others, thereby reconstructing their state of mind and predicting their intentions. Dysfunction in these ...

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Social anxiety

Social anxiety is a term used to describe an experience of anxiety (emotional discomfort, fear, apprehension or worry) regarding social situations, interactions with other and being evaluated or scrutinized by other people. It occurs early in childhood as a normal part of the development of social functioning, but may go unnoticed until adolescence . People vary in how often they experience social anxiety or in which kinds of situations. It can be related to shyness or other emotional or temperamental factors, but its exact nature is still the subject of research and theory.

A psychopathological form of social anxiety is called "social anxiety disorder" or social phobia. This disorder can become major obsessions and can result in a reduced quality of life. Social anxiety can be self-integrated and persistent for people who suffer from O.C.D, which can make social anxiety even harder to control, especially if ignored.

Some use the terms "social anxiety" and "social phobia" interchangeably.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA