Neuroscience

Why is the brain disturbed by harsh sounds?

Why do the harsh sounds emitted by alarms or human shrieks grab our attention? What is going on in the brain when it detects these frequencies? Neuroscientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and Geneva University Hospitals ...

Neuroscience

How the brain filters sounds

The sound environment is extremely dense, which is why the brain has to adapt and implement filtering mechanisms that allow it to hold its attention on the most important elements and save energy. When two identical sounds ...

Neuroscience

Speech development starts in the womb

New parents are always thrilled when their offspring finally speaks its first words—usually at the age of 12 to 18 months. What parents often don't know is that the regions of the brain that recognise and process speech ...

Medical research

Could sound waves bring us smarter medical implants?

Pinned to a wall in Tommaso Melodia's office, next to a stack of wireless technology guidebooks, is a child's illustration: a smiling heart symbol alongside the word "Papa." His office is covered with drawings like these, ...

Neuroscience

How the brain distinguishes between voice and sound

Is the brain capable of distinguishing a voice from the specific sounds it utters? In an attempt to answer this question, researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, – in collaboration with the University ...

Neuroscience

The voice is key to making sense of the words in our brain

Scientists at the Basque research center BCBL conclude that the voice is fundamental for mentally presenting the meaning of words in the brain. This finding implies a greater knowledge about how sound waves bring additional ...

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Sound

Sound is a travelling wave which is an oscillation of pressure transmitted through a solid, liquid, or gas, composed of frequencies within the range of hearing and of a level sufficiently strong to be heard, or the sensation stimulated in organs of hearing by such vibrations.

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