Neuroscience

Researchers describe the first model of mitochondrial epilepsy

Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have become the first to describe a model of mitochondrial epilepsy which raises hope for better therapies for patients with this incapacitating condition. Their paper has been published ...

Neuroscience

A muscle protein promotes nerve healing

Injuries or diseases of nerves in the central nervous system result in lifelong disabilities, such as paraplegia caused by a damage to the spinal cord or blindness following the injury of the optic nerve. "Nerve regeneration ...

Neuroscience

How brains distinguish between self-touch and touch by others

The brain seems to reduce sensory perception from an area of skin when we touch it ourselves, according to a new study from Linköping University published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The ...

Neuroscience

Research sheds light on spinal cord injuries

Thousands of people worldwide suffer severe spinal cord injuries each year, but little is known about why these injuries often continue to deteriorate long after the initial damage occurs.

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Spinal cord

The spinal cord is a long, thin, tubular bundle of nervous tissue and support cells that extends from the brain. The brain and spinal cord together make up the central nervous system. Enclosed within, and protected by, the bony vertebral column, the spinal cord functions primarily in the transmission of neural signals between the brain and the rest of the body, but also contains neural circuits that can independently control numerous reflexes and central pattern generators.

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