Neuroscience

Researchers discover new nerve pathway in the body

A newly discovered nerve pathway that connects the foot and the face on the same side of the body may potentially provide explanations to unknown neurological conditions, according to new research led by Curtin University.

Neuroscience

ALS research reveals new treatment approach

On June 2, 1941, at the age of 37, baseball player Lou Gehrig succumbed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a progressive muscle degeneration disease. Today, nearly 80 years following his death, scientists are still searching ...

Neuroscience

Fooling nerve cells into acting normal

Nerve cells, or neurons—specifically the "workhorse cells" involved in walking, breathing and chewing—can adjust to changes in the body, but they never stop working unless there is an fatal injury. What exactly signals ...

Neuroscience

In lab, researchers flip pain switch in spinal cord cells

Facing an urgent need for safer and more effective therapies for those suffering from debilitating pain in the midst of an opioid crisis, Saint Louis University researchers are on a mission to find a non-narcotic off-switch ...

Neuroscience

Experimental drug shows promise for genetic form of ALS

An early stage trial of an investigational therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) suggests that people could tolerate the experimental drug and, in exploratory results, the experimental drug was linked to possible ...

Neuroscience

The GPS of neurons now better understood

Our nerves consist of small cables responsible for circulating information to every part of our body, allowing us, for instance, to move. These cables are actually cells called neurons with long extensions named axons.

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Spinal cord

The spinal cord is a long, thin, tubular bundle of nervous tissue and support cells that extends from the brain. The brain and spinal cord together make up the central nervous system. Enclosed within, and protected by, the bony vertebral column, the spinal cord functions primarily in the transmission of neural signals between the brain and the rest of the body, but also contains neural circuits that can independently control numerous reflexes and central pattern generators.

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