Neuroscience

Neuroscientists find new factors behind better vision

The size of our primary visual cortex and the amount of brain tissue we have dedicated to processing visual information at certain locations of visual space can predict how well we can see, a team of neuroscientists has discovered. ...

Neuroscience

Scientists uncover key factor in neocortex development

Scientists at the Texas A&M University College of Medicine have made a breakthrough discovery about the development of the brain. This new information contributes to our understanding of how the part of the brain that makes ...

Genetics

Genetic risk for psychiatric disorders linked to brain changes

(HealthDay)—Polygenic risk scores for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia are associated with ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) structure and function, according to a study published in the July/August issue of the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Risk factors for PHACE syndrome ID'd in infantile hemangiomas

(HealthDay)—Factors associated with higher and lower risk of posterior fossa malformations, hemangioma, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, eye anomalies (PHACE) syndrome have been identified in children with infantile ...

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Surface area

Surface area is the measure of how much exposed area a solid object has, expressed in square units. Mathematical description of the surface area is considerably more involved then the definition of arc length of a curve. For polyhedra (objects with flat polygonal faces) the surface area is the sum of the areas of its faces. Smooth surfaces, such as a sphere, are assigned surface area using their representation as parametric surfaces. This definition of the surface area is based on methods of infinitesimal calculus and involves partial derivatives and double integration.

General definition of surface area was sought by Henri Lebesgue and Hermann Minkowski at the turn of the twentieth century. Their work led to the development of geometric measure theory which studies various notions of surface area for irregular objects of any dimension. An important example is the Minkowski content of a surface.

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