Oncology & Cancer

Cancer incidence up for adolescents and young adults

(HealthDay)—Among adolescents and young adults (AYAs), cancer incidence increased during 2007 to 2016, according to a report published online Sept. 17 in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.

Oncology & Cancer

Identifying survivors at high risk of secondary cancers

Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital are studying the combined effect of cancer treatments and inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes. Their results may help predict which survivors are at increased risk of ...

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Thyroid neoplasm

Thyroid neoplasm or thyroid cancer usually refers to any of four kinds of malignant tumors of the thyroid gland: papillary, follicular, medullary or anaplastic. Most patients are 25 to 65 years of age when first diagnosed; women are more affected than men. Papillary and follicular tumors are the most common. They grow slowly and may recur, but are generally not fatal in patients under 45 years of age. Medullary tumors have a good prognosis if restricted to the thyroid gland and a poorer prognosis if metastasis occurs. Anaplastic tumors are fast-growing and respond poorly to therapy.

Thyroid nodules are diagnosed by ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (USG/FNA) or frequently by thyroidectomy (surgical removal and subsequent histological examination). As thyroid cancer can take up iodine, radioactive iodine is commonly used to treat thyroid carcinomas, followed by TSH suppression by high-dose thyroxine therapy.

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