Psychology & Psychiatry

True lies: How letter patterns color perceptions of truth

People today constantly encounter claims such as "Advil kills pain," "coffee prevents depression," or "Hilary promises amnesty" as brands, news outlets and social media sites vie for our attention—yet few people take the ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

I'll believe it when I meme it

Memes can be used to spread prejudiced messages and are more likely to be believed if they are paired with a lot of likes from like-minded people, researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have found.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Lying in a foreign language is easier

It is not easy to tell when someone is lying. This is even more difficult when potential liars speak in a language other than their native tongue. Psychologists of the University of Würzburg investigated why that is so.

Pediatrics

To tell the truth: kids' edition

(HealthDay)—Teaching kids about telling the truth is a critical life lesson. And your approach can determine how motivated your kids are to be honest.

Pediatrics

Docs should be aware of family beliefs regarding nondisclosure

(HealthDay)—Physicians should be aware of societal codes of conduct that affect family beliefs and behaviors regarding information disclosure to pediatric patients, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in JAMA ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

White people show race bias when judging deception

When making judgments about who is lying and who is telling the truth, new research shows that White people are more likely to label a Black person as a truth-teller compared with a White person, even though their spontaneous ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Punishing kids for lying just doesn't work

If you want your child to tell the truth, it's best not to threaten to punish them if they lie. That's what researchers discovered through a simple experiment involving 372 children between the ages of 4 and 8.

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