Gastroenterology

5 reasons to see a gastroenterologist

If you regularly experience common ailments—like heartburn or stomachaches that don't improve with over-the-counter medications, or you have severe pain or other symptoms—a gastroenterologist could help.

Surgery

Guidelines issued for endoscopy of surgically altered bowel

(HealthDay)—In a consensus guideline issued by the Global Interventional Inflammatory Bowel Disease Group and published in the June 1 issue of The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, recommendations are presented for ...

Gerontology & Geriatrics

2001 to 2018 saw increase in estimated prevalence of IBD in seniors

During 2001 to 2018, the overall estimated prevalence of Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis increased among Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, with a higher increase seen among non-Hispanic Blacks, according to research ...

Medical research

Defects in a specific cell type may cause ulcerative colitis

There are many variants of "goblet cells" in the intestines and they seem to have different functions, according to a new study from the University of Gothenburg. The study indicates that defects in goblet cells of a particular ...

Gastroenterology

Can diet help with inflammatory bowel disease?

More than 6.8 million people worldwide are estimated to be living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is believed to be the result of a malfunctioning immune system, which results in an inappropriate immune response ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Anxiety, depression common with inflammatory bowel disease

(HealthDay)—There is a high prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to a review published online March 12 in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

Genetics

First multi-whole-genome study of IBD in African Americans

In African Americans, the genetic risk landscape for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is very different from that of people with European ancestry, according to results of the first whole-genome study of IBD in African Americans. ...

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Ulcerative colitis

Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon. The main symptom of active disease is usually constant diarrhea mixed with blood, of gradual onset. Ulcerative colitis is, however, believed to have a systemic etiology that leads to many symptoms outside the intestine. Because of the name, IBD is often confused with irritable bowel syndrome ("IBS"), a troublesome, but much less serious, condition. Ulcerative colitis has similarities to Crohn's disease, another form of IBD. Ulcerative colitis is an intermittent disease, with periods of exacerbated symptoms, and periods that are relatively symptom-free. Although the symptoms of ulcerative colitis can sometimes diminish on their own, the disease usually requires treatment to go into remission.

Ulcerative colitis occurs in 35–100 people for every 100,000 in the United States, or less than 0.1% of the population. The disease tends to be more common in northern areas. Although ulcerative colitis has no known cause, there is a presumed genetic component to susceptibility. The disease may be triggered in a susceptible person by environmental factors. Although dietary modification may reduce the discomfort of a person with the disease, ulcerative colitis is not thought to be caused by dietary factors. Although ulcerative colitis is treated as though it were an autoimmune disease, there is no consensus that it is such. Treatment is with anti-inflammatory drugs, immunosuppression, and biological therapy targeting specific components of the immune response. Colectomy (partial or total removal of the large bowel through surgery) is occasionally necessary, and is considered to be a cure for the disease.

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