Biomedical technology

Applying UV light to common disinfectants makes them safer to use

Over 400 common disinfectants currently in use could be made safer for people and the environment and could better fight the COVID-19 virus with the simple application of UVC light, a new study from the University of Waterloo ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

'COVID-killing' remote working pods to revive town centers

Ghost town high streets could come back to life using empty shops to house sealed, self-contained, self-cleaning remote working pods that use ultraviolet light to kill coronavirus. Home workers could escape cramped kitchen ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Researchers develop autonomous robot to kill SARS-CoV-2

Ultraviolet light is a form of radiation that can be used for sterilization and disinfection. With schools and offices beginning to meet in-person again despite little change in the rate of COVID-19 infections, easy, low-cost ...

Arthritis & Rheumatism

Magnetic field and hydrogels could be used to grow new cartilage

Using a magnetic field and hydrogels, a team of researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have demonstrated a new possible way to rebuild complex body tissues, which could result in ...

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Ultraviolet

Ultraviolet (UV) light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light, but longer than x-rays, in the range 10 nm to 400 nm, and energies from 3 eV to 124 eV. It is so named because the spectrum consists of electromagnetic waves with frequencies higher than those that humans identify as the color violet.

UV light is found in sunlight and is emitted by electric arcs and specialized lights such as black lights. As an ionizing radiation it can cause chemical reactions, and causes many substances to glow or fluoresce. Most people are aware of the effects of UV through the painful condition of sunburn, but the UV spectrum has many other effects, both beneficial and damaging, on human health.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA