Neuroscience

Controlling your home with the power of thought

Walking across the room to switch on a light—such a simple everyday activity involves enormously complex computations by the brain as it requires interpretation of the scene, control of the gait and planning upcoming movements ...

Cardiology

PulseCam peeks below skin to map blood flow

Rice University engineers have found a way to use a video camera to peek below the skin and make high-resolution maps that show doctors and nurses exactly how much blood is reaching the capillaries.

Psychology & Psychiatry

What we see affects what we feel

Chronic back pain is reduced when people watch a real-time video of their back for a short time. Watching it also increases the effectiveness of therapies such as massage. This has been shown by studies conducted by the team ...

Neuroscience

Brains work in sync during music therapy

For the first time researchers have been able to demonstrate that the brains of a patient and therapist become synchronised during a music therapy session, a breakthrough that could improve future interactions between patients ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Don't believe everything psychologists tell you about memory

Over the past couple of decades, there has been an explosion of research into "false memories," showing that our memory can be subtly altered by a variety of internal and external factors. Many psychologists think the public ...

Oncology & Cancer

Q&A: Preventing colon cancer with screening, early detection

Dear Mayo Clinic: Are there ways to prevent colon cancer? What about early symptoms to watch for? I just turned 50, and I've heard colon cancer is more common as you get older. I'd like to lower my risk of getting this disease ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

What do your earliest childhood memories say about you?

We experience thousands of events across childhood, and yet as adults we recall only a handful. Some might be "firsts" (our first ice cream, our first day at school), or significant life events (the birth of a sibling, moving ...

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Video camera

A video camera is a camera used for electronic motion picture acquisition, initially developed by the television industry but now common in other applications as well. The earliest video cameras were those of John Logie Baird, based on the electromechanical Nipkow disk and used by the BBC in experimental broadcasts through the 1930s. All-electronic designs based on the cathode ray tube, such as Vladimir Zworykin's Iconoscope and Philo T. Farnsworth's Image dissector, supplanted the Baird system by the 1940s and remained in wide use until the 1980s, when cameras based on solid-state image sensors such as CCDs (and later CMOS active pixel sensors) eliminated common problems with tube technologies such as burn-in and made digital video workflow practical.

Video cameras are used primarily in two modes. The first, characteristic of much early television, is what might be called a live broadcast, where the camera feeds real time images directly to a screen for immediate observation; in addition to live television production, such usage is characteristic of security, military/tactical, and industrial operations where surreptitious or remote viewing is required. The second is to have the images recorded to a storage device for archiving or further processing; for many years, videotape has been the primary format used for this purpose, but optical disc media, hard disk, and flash memory are all increasingly used. Recorded video is used not only in television and film production, but also surveillance and monitoring tasks where unattended recording of a situation is required for later analysis.

Modern video cameras have numerous designs and uses, not all of which resemble the early television cameras.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA