Psychology & Psychiatry

Why do we like to play violent video games?

Video games aren't just a hobby for kids or teens. People of all ages and genders from all walks of life play them, and they're available in nearly every home, handbag and pocket around the world.

Neuroscience

New study focuses on improving cognitive symptoms of lupus

A National Jewish Health led study recently published in Lupus finds that technology using video game-based cognitive therapy improves attention and executive functioning in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Psychology & Psychiatry

Video games can boost children's intelligence: study

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have studied how the screen habits of U.S. children correlates with how their cognitive abilities develop over time. They found that the children who spent an above-average time ...

Neuroscience

Maternal socialization, not biology, shapes child brain activity

Children of mothers with clinical depression are at three times greater risk to develop depression themselves than are their low-risk peers. Researchers are working to understand the neural underpinnings of the risk, and ...

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Video game

A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device. The word video in video game traditionally referred to a raster display device. However, with the popular use of the term "video game", it now implies any type of display device. The electronic systems used to play video games are known as platforms; examples of these are personal computers and video game consoles. These platforms range from large computers to small handheld devices. Specialized video games such as arcade games, while previously common, have gradually declined in use.

The input device used to manipulate video games is called a game controller, and varies across platforms. For example, a dedicated console controller might consist of only a button and a joystick. Another may feature a dozen buttons and one or more joysticks. Early personal computer games often needed a keyboard for gameplay, or more commonly, required the user to buy a separate joystick with at least one button.[citation needed] Many modern computer games allow, or even require, the player to use a keyboard and mouse simultaneously.

Video games typically also use other ways of providing interaction and information to the player. Audio is almost universal, using sound reproduction devices, such as speakers and headphones. But other feedback may come via haptic peripherals, such as vibration force feedback.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA