Surgery

Exploring new dimensions in surgery

When you enter Operating Theatre 3 of the new central operating department at Pius Hospital Oldenburg, Germany, the first thing you notice is the large, three-part mural on the back wall: a dreamlike landscape of white dunes, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study shows audio experience in virtual reality can be 'authentic'

Experts, as part of the University of York's XR Stories project, have proposed a new sound strategy to developing virtual reality (VR) environments, based on how people receive images and sounds from the real world, ultimately ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Could gaming improve people's mental health by combating anxiety?

In 2017, Ninja Theory, advised by Cambridge academic Professor Paul Fletcher, took the gaming world by storm with Hellblade, which accurately depicted psychosis. Now the company has teamed up with one of Fletcher's Ph.D. ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Technology boosts psychosocial well-being of people with dementia

The Ph.D. research of Yuan Feng focuses on promoting the well-being of a vulnerable population in our society—people with dementia—using interactive technologies. Collaborating with the Vitalis Berckelhof, a Dutch residential ...

Biomedical technology

Can an electric zap trick our brains into reducing our salt intake?

An estimated 2.5m deaths each year could be prevented globally if individuals cut back their salt consumption to the recommended daily intake of less than five grams, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Now, ...

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Virtual reality

Virtual reality (VR) is a technology which allows a user to interact with a computer-simulated environment, whether that environment is a simulation of the real world or an imaginary world. Most current virtual reality environments are primarily visual experiences, displayed either on a computer screen or through special or stereoscopic displays, but some simulations include additional sensory information, such as sound through speakers or headphones. Some advanced, haptic systems now include tactile information, generally known as force feedback, in medical and gaming applications. Users can interact with a virtual environment or a virtual artifact (VA) either through the use of standard input devices such as a keyboard and mouse, or through multimodal devices such as a wired glove, the Polhemus boom arm, and omnidirectional treadmill. The simulated environment can be similar to the real world, for example, simulations for pilot or combat training, or it can differ significantly from reality, as in VR games. In practice, it is currently very difficult to create a high-fidelity virtual reality experience, due largely to technical limitations on processing power, image resolution and communication bandwidth. However, those limitations are expected to eventually be overcome as processor, imaging and data communication technologies become more powerful and cost-effective over time.

Virtual Reality is often used to describe a wide variety of applications, commonly associated with its immersive, highly visual, 3D environments. The development of CAD software, graphics hardware acceleration, head mounted displays, database gloves and miniaturization have helped popularize the notion. In the book The Metaphysics of Virtual Reality, Michael Heim identifies seven different concepts of Virtual Reality: simulation, interaction, artificiality, immersion, telepresence, full-body immersion, and network communication. The definition still has a certain futuristic romanticism attached. People often identify VR with Head Mounted Displays and Data Suits.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA