Neuroscience

For better deep neural network vision, just add feedback (loops)

Your ability to recognize objects is remarkable. If you see a cup under unusual lighting or from unexpected directions, there's a good chance that your brain will still compute that it is a cup. Such precise object recognition ...

Neuroscience

A new window into macaque brain connections

Researchers can now see how the two sides of the living brain mirror each other thanks to a new combination-imaging technique. The method dubbed "opto-OISI" takes advantage of rapidly developing high-resolution optical technologies ...

Neuroscience

What is the best sense? Scientists are still battling it out

If there is one thing Twitter has taught us, it's that the world loves a question that sounds stupid, but actually has a profound and interesting answer. For instance, what would happen if the world suddenly turned into blueberries, ...

Neuroscience

Mouse study examines the underpinnings of hallucinations

Hallucinations result in dramatic disruptions in perception and cognition, but the changes in brain activity that underlie such alterations are not well understood. In a study publishing March 26 in the journal Cell Reports, ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Brain wave stimulation may improve Alzheimer's symptoms

By exposing mice to a unique combination of light and sound, MIT neuroscientists have shown that they can improve cognitive and memory impairments similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients.

Neuroscience

The inferotemporal cortex is key to differentiating between objects

As visual information flows into the brain through the retina, the visual cortex transforms the sensory input into coherent perceptions. Neuroscientists have long hypothesized that a part of the visual cortex called the inferotemporal ...

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Visual cortex

The term visual cortex refers to the primary visual cortex (also known as striate cortex or V1) and extrastriate visual cortical areas such as V2, V3, V4, and V5. The primary visual cortex is anatomically equivalent to Brodmann area 17, or BA17.

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