Neuroscience

How the brain 'approximates' without actually counting

From the time of early infancy, humans are endowed with the capacity to approximate the number of objects in their visual field, an ability that continues throughout life and may underlie the development of more complex mathematical ...

Neuroscience

Why two out of three babies are cradled on the left

Over two thirds of all people prefer to carry a baby in their left arm. The figure is as high as three quarters for women, and the same also applies to right-handed people. This is the result of an analysis of 40 studies ...

Neuroscience

Learning to see friendly faces in different places

Meaningful social interactions train visual cortex neurons to recognize a familiar face in different visual locations, suggests new research published in eNeuro. The study demonstrates how the brain learns to perceive other ...

Neuroscience

Eyes in the back of the head

Spatial representations of surroundings, including those outside the visual field, are crucial for guiding movement in a three-dimensional world. The visual system appears to provide sufficient information for movement despite ...

Neuroscience

A heavy working memory load may sink brainwave 'synch'

Everyday experience makes it obvious - sometimes frustratingly so - that our working memory capacity is limited. We can only keep so many things consciously in mind at once. The results of a new study may explain why: They ...

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