Psychology & Psychiatry

Scientists work their magic on 'shrunken finger illusion'

What happens when you rest a chopped ping pong ball on your finger and look at it from above? Experimental psychologists from KU Leuven, Belgium, have shown that our visual system fills in the bottom part of the ball, even ...

Neuroscience

Neuronal feedback could change what we 'see'

Ever see something that isn't really there? Could your mind be playing tricks on you? The "tricks" might be your brain reacting to feedback between neurons in different parts of the visual system, according to a study published ...

Neuroscience

The invisible world of human perception

Stage magicians are not the only ones who can distract the eye: a new cognitive psychology experiment demonstrates how all human beings have a built-in ability to stop paying attention to objects that are right in front of ...

Neuroscience

Virtual motion, real consequences

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich researchers have shown that virtual optical stimuli can lead to aftereffects that significantly alter our perception of self-motion. This finding has implications for safe use of emerging ...

Neuroscience

Brain fills gaps to produce a likely picture

Researchers at Radboud University use visual illusions to demonstrate to what extent the brain interprets visual signals. They were surprised to discover that active interpretation occurs early on in signal processing. In ...

Neuroscience

Animals could help reveal why humans fall for illusions

Visual illusions, such as the rabbit-duck and café wall are fascinating because they remind us of the discrepancy between perception and reality. But our knowledge of such illusions has been largely limited to studying humans.

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