Neuroscience

The mystery of visual stability

We move our eyes several times per second. These fast eye movements, called saccades, create large image shifts on the retina—making our visual system work hard to maintain a stable perceptual world. Remapping the retinal ...

Neuroscience

Which areas of our brains represent the colors we see?

Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet: The colors of the rainbow are well known to anyone who remembers "Roy G. Biv." However, scientific research has long shown that such colors are not inherent to the physical ...

Neuroscience

The brain's solution for seeing as is and seeing flexibly

New experiments described in The Journal of Neuroscience support distinct roles for two brain pathways in processing information related to an object, with one carrying a largely invariant representation of an object and ...

Neuroscience

New pathways discovered to prevent blindness

Scientists have made a major new discovery detailing how areas of the brain responsible for vision could potentially adapt to injury or trauma and ultimately prevent blindness.

Health

Medical myth: Reading from a screen harms your eyes

The time most of us spend looking at a screen has rapidly increased over the past decade. If we're not at work on the computer, we're likely to stay tuned into the online sphere via a smart phone or tablet. Shelves of books ...

page 1 from 2