Health

Consumer health: Nuts and your heart

March is National Nutrition Month, which makes this a good time to learn more about the heart health benefits of eating nuts.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Why healthy eating can help you fight COVID-19

Wearing a face covering, physical distancing, and hand washing are not the only ways that people can protect themselves from COVID-19.

Neuroscience

Antioxidant cocktail key to preventing Alzheimer's

Research from The University of Western Australia has found a diet rich in nutrients and antioxidants may prevent or even reverse the effects of Alzheimer's disease.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

No, CBD is not a miracle molecule that can cure coronavirus

The claims for CBD's alleged healing powers have been so exaggerated that it's no surprise that a CBD maker was recently warned by the New York attorney general for claiming that the molecule can fight COVID-19. There are ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

From dentists to playdates: Tips on social distancing and COVID-19

Millions of people across the country are hunkering down in their homes in response to social distancing mandates designed to reduce spread of the novel coronavirus. Federal and state authorities are advising people to avoid ...

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Vitamin E

Vitamin E is the collective name for a set of 8 related α-, β-, γ-, and δ-tocopherols and the corresponding four tocotrienols, which are fat-soluble vitamins with antioxidant properties. Of these, α-tocopherol (also written as alpha-tocopherol) has been most studied as it has the highest bioavailability.

It has been claimed that α-tocopherol is the most important lipid-soluble antioxidant, and that it protects cell membranes from oxidation by reacting with lipid radicals produced in the lipid peroxidation chain reaction. This would remove the free radical intermediates and prevent the oxidation reaction from continuing. The oxidised α-tocopheroxyl radicals produced in this process may be recycled back to the active reduced form through reduction by other antioxidants, such as ascorbate, retinol or ubiquinol. However, the importance of the antioxidant properties of this molecule at the concentrations present in the body are not clear and it is possible that the reason why vitamin E is required in the diet is unrelated to its ability to act as an antioxidant.. Other forms of vitamin E have their own unique properties. For example, γ-tocopherol (also written as gamma-tocopherol) is a nucleophile that may react with electrophilic mutagens; and the tocotrienols having specialized roles in protecting neurons from damage, cancer prevention and cholesterol reduction by inhibiting the activity of HMG-CoA reductase[16-1];δ-tocotrienol blocks processing of sterol regulatory element‐binding proteins (SREBPs)[16-1].However, the roles and importance of all of the various forms of vitamin E are presently unclear, and it has even been suggested that the most important function of vitamin E is as a signaling molecule, and that it has no significant role in antioxidant metabolism.

Most studies about vitamin E have supplemented using only the synthetic alpha-tocopherol, but doing so leads to reduced serum gamma- and delta-tocopherol concentrations. Moreover, a 2007 clinical study involving synthetic alpha-tocopherol concluded that supplementation did not reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events in middle aged and older men. For more info, read article tocopherol.

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