Medical research

Engineered T cells for type 1 diabetes move closer to clinic

For much of the last decade, Dr. David Rawlings, director of Seattle Children's Research Institute's Center for Immunity and Immunotherapies, has dreamed of developing a therapy for children with type 1 diabetes that doesn't ...

Oncology & Cancer

Unique cells found in lung cancer patients may predict survival

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. and most who are diagnosed with lung cancer do not survive five years. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type where tumor cells shed ...

Medical research

Study probes efficacy of APOSEC for allergic skin lesions

APOSEC is a biologic wound-healing agent developed by thoracic surgeon Hendrik Jan Ankersmit from MedUni Vienna. Together with dermatological basic researcher Michael Mildner, also from MedUni Vienna, he has now also investigated ...

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White blood cell

White blood cells (WBCs), or leukocytes (also spelled "leucocytes"), are cells of the immune system defending the body against both infectious disease and foreign materials. Five different and diverse types of leukocytes exist, but they are all produced and derived from a multipotent cell in the bone marrow known as a hematopoietic stem cell. Leukocytes are found throughout the body, including the blood and lymphatic system.

The number of leukocytes in the blood is often an indicator of disease. There are normally between 4×109 and 1.1×1010 white blood cells in a litre of blood, making up approximately 1% of blood in a healthy adult. An increase in the number of leukocytes over the upper limits is called leukocytosis, and in leukopenia, this number is much lower than the lower limit. The physical properties of leukocytes, such as volume, conductivity, and granularity, may change due to activation, the presence of immature cells, or the presence of malignant leukocytes in leukemia.

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