Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Starving cancer instead of feeding it poison

A patent application for a drug that could destroy the deadly childhood disease known as acute lymphoblastic leukemia—and potentially other cancers as well—has been submitted by researchers at Sandia ...

May 13, 2015
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To beat leukemia, boost cell signaling, study suggests

A new study of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) led by UC San Francisco researchers puts an intriguing new twist on anti-cancer strategies. Rather than inhibiting cellular signals that arise from a cancer-driving ...

Mar 26, 2015
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Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a form of leukemia, or cancer of the white blood cells characterized by excess lymphoblasts.

Malignant, immature white blood cells continuously multiply and are overproduced in the bone marrow. ALL causes damage and death by crowding out normal cells in the bone marrow, and by spreading (infiltrating) to other organs. ALL is most common in childhood with a peak incidence at 2–5 years of age, and another peak in old age. The overall cure rate in children is about 80%, and about 45%-60% of adults have long-term disease-free survival.

Acute refers to the relatively short time course of the disease (being fatal in as little as a few weeks if left untreated) to differentiate it from the very different disease of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which has a potential time course of many years. It is interchangeably referred to as Lymphocytic or Lymphoblastic. This refers to the cells that are involved, which if they were normal would be referred to as lymphocytes but are seen in this disease in a relatively immature (also termed 'blast') state.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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