Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Findings on insomnia in children and cancer

College of Nursing colleagues Ellyn Matthews, PhD, RN, AOCNS, CBSM, Madalynn Neu, PhD, RN, and Paul Cook, PhD, have published research findings on sleep among children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and their mothers.

Dec 17, 2014
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Blincyto approved for rare leukemia

(HealthDay)—Blincyto (blinatumomab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat Philadelphia chromosome-negative precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a rare cancer of the bone marrow.

Dec 03, 2014
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Immune therapy induces remission for many with ALL

(HealthDay)—An experimental immune-system therapy can often lead to complete remission in advanced acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients who have run out of other options, according to research published ...

Oct 16, 2014
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Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a form of leukemia, or cancer of the white blood cells characterized by excess lymphoblasts.

Malignant, immature white blood cells continuously multiply and are overproduced in the bone marrow. ALL causes damage and death by crowding out normal cells in the bone marrow, and by spreading (infiltrating) to other organs. ALL is most common in childhood with a peak incidence at 2–5 years of age, and another peak in old age. The overall cure rate in children is about 80%, and about 45%-60% of adults have long-term disease-free survival.

Acute refers to the relatively short time course of the disease (being fatal in as little as a few weeks if left untreated) to differentiate it from the very different disease of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, which has a potential time course of many years. It is interchangeably referred to as Lymphocytic or Lymphoblastic. This refers to the cells that are involved, which if they were normal would be referred to as lymphocytes but are seen in this disease in a relatively immature (also termed 'blast') state.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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