Bladder Cancer

HHS releases 13th Report on Carcinogens

Four substances have been added in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 13th Report on Carcinogens, a science-based document that identifies chemical, biological, and physical agents that are ...

Oct 02, 2014
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New target for aggressive bladder cancer

An international team of scientists have discovered a faulty process in certain bladder cancers that could point to new ways to treat patients with an aggressive form of the disease.

Jul 10, 2014
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Team revises the role of cohesin in cancer

Massive sequencing of cancer genomes brings to light new genes every day that could be involved in the process of tumour formation. A good example of this is cohesin, a ring-shaped protein complex that embraces DNA to control ...

Jun 24, 2014
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Bladder cancer is any of several types of malignancy arising from the epithelial lining (i.e. "the urothelium") of the urinary bladder. The bladder is rarely involved by non-epithelial cancers (such as lymphoma or sarcoma) but these are not properly included in the colloquial term "bladder cancer." It is a disease in which abnormal cells multiply without control in the bladder. The bladder is a hollow, muscular organ that stores urine; it is located in the pelvis. The most common type of bladder cancer recapitulates the normal histology of the urothelium and is known as transitional cell carcinoma.

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