Cervical Cancer

Navigators help patients overcome health-care inequities

Traversing the healthcare system can be daunting for almost anyone. Add in the many obstacles that low-income uninsured populations face, and it becomes tremendously more difficult. But a new Northwestern Medicine study shows ...

Feb 25, 2015
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New studies quantify morcellation's link to uterine cancer

The dangers of a power tool used in gynecological surgery have been debated for more than a year, with experts offering varying estimates of the chance that an undetected uterine cancer would be spread - and likely worsened ...

Feb 23, 2015
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New HPV approved after international phase 2/3 trial

Approximately 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States and another 4,000 die annually from the disease. However, most cervical cancers are preventable through immunization against the ...

Feb 20, 2015
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Let's talk about sex... after cancer

Romance may still be lingering in the air, but for many cancer survivors Valentine's Day was just another reminder of how their sexuality has been scarred by cancer.

Feb 20, 2015
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Do adults need booster shots?

When we think of vaccinations, the image of children getting their shots at a health clinic comes to mind, but there are many reasons adults need to think about vaccinations, as well.

Feb 10, 2015
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HPV vaccination not linked to riskier sex

Receiving the human papillomavirus vaccine does not increase rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescent females. The vaccine, which can prevent cervical cancer in women, has had a low uptake, ...

Feb 09, 2015
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Mexico escalating the fight against breast cancer

On Avenue San Fernando, a tree-lined street crowded with food stands, the new wing of Mexico's flagship cancer hospital gleams like a silver airplane. Barely a year old, the light-filled structure attached to the National ...

Jan 29, 2015
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Cervical cancer is the term for a malignant neoplasm arising from cells originating in the cervix uteri. One of the most common symptoms of cervical cancer is abnormal vaginal bleeding, but in some cases there may be no obvious symptoms until the cancer has progressed to an advanced stage. Treatment usually consists of surgery (including local excision) in early stages, and chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in more advanced stages of the disease.

Cancer screening using the Pap smear can identify precancerous and potentially precancerous changes in cervical cells and tissue. Treatment of high-grade changes can prevent the development of cancer in many victims. In developed countries, the widespread use of cervical screening programs has reduced the incidence of invasive cervical cancer by 50% or more.[citation needed]

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection appears to be a necessary factor in the development of almost all cases (90+%) of cervical cancer. HPV vaccines effective against the two strains of this large family of viruses that currently cause approximately 70% of cases of cervical cancer have been licensed in the U.S, Canada, Australia and the EU. Since the vaccines only cover some of the cancer causing ("high-risk") types of HPV, women should seek regular Pap smear screening, even after vaccination.

The cervix is the narrow portion of the uterus where it joins with the top of the vagina. Most cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, arising in the squamous (flattened) epithelial cells that line the cervix. Adenocarcinoma, arising in glandular epithelial cells is the second most common type. Very rarely, cancer can arise in other types of cells in the cervix.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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