Hearing Loss

A short stay in darkness may heal hearing woes

Call it the Ray Charles Effect: a young child who is blind develops a keen ability to hear things that others cannot. Researchers have long known that very young brains are malleable enough to re-wire some ...

Feb 05, 2014
popularity 5 / 5 (6) | comments 1 | with audio podcast

How the brain processes musical hallucinations

A woman with an "iPod in her head" has helped scientists at Newcastle University and University College London identify the areas of the brain that are affected when patients experience a rare condition called ...

Jan 28, 2014
popularity 4.5 / 5 (8) | comments 5 | with audio podcast

Deafness genetic mutation discovered

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have found a new genetic mutation responsible for deafness and hearing loss associated with Usher syndrome type 1.

Sep 30, 2012
popularity 1 / 5 (1) | comments 0 | with audio podcast

Hearing impairment is a disability wherein the ability to detect certain frequencies of sound is completely or partially impaired. Deafness can mean the same thing, but is more commonly applied to the case of severe or complete hearing impairment.

When applied to humans, the term hearing impaired is rejected by the majority of deaf people where the terms deaf and hard-of-hearing are preferred.

This text uses material from Wikipedia licensed under CC BY-SA

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