Immune Rejection

A macaque model of HIV infection

Researchers have taken a major step toward developing a better animal model of human AIDS. Such a model could greatly improve researchers' ability to evaluate potential strategies for preventing and treating the disease.

Jun 02, 2016
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Pig hearts may save human lives: researchers

One day, cardiac patients may enjoy a new lease on life with pig hearts beating in their chests, said researchers reporting a major advance Tuesday in cross-species organ transplantation.

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Long-term benefits to the liver-kidney transplant

A new study from physicians at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, found there may be long-term benefits to simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation versus kidney transplantation alone. The study, "Decreased Chronic Cellular and Antibody-Mediated ...

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Wrapping up multiple sclerosis

With one drug to shut down its progression and another to undo its damage, plus a worldwide effort stalking the origins of multiple sclerosis, MS doesn't stand a chance.

Apr 26, 2016
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Transplant rejection occurs when transplanted tissue is rejected by the recipient's immune system, which destroys the transplanted tissue. Transplant rejection can be lessened by determining the molecular similitude between donor and recipient and by use of immunosuppressant drugs after transplant.

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