Neurodegeneration

Astrocytes in the neurodegerating brain

Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have discovered that specialised 'astrocytes' abandon their posts as protectors and repairers of the brain when primed by the neurodegeneration of cells around them.

Jun 10, 2015
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PET reveals inflammatory cycle in the brain

Neuroinflammation caused by a reactive immune system could be tripping off the neurodegeneration seen in certain dementias, multiple sclerosis, and other deadly diseases of the nervous system. A novel molecular imaging technique ...

Jun 08, 2015
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Controller in the cell

Quality control is important – this is not only applicable to industrial production but also true for all life processes. However, whereas an enterprise can start a large-scale recall in case of any doubt, defects in the ...

Jun 08, 2015
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Neurodegeneration is the umbrella term for the progressive loss of structure or function of neurons, including death of neurons. Many neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and Huntington’s occur as a result of neurodegenerative processes. As research progresses, many similarities appear which relate these diseases to one another on a sub-cellular level. Discovering these similarities offers hope for therapeutic advances that could ameliorate many diseases simultaneously. There are many parallels between different neurodegenerative disorders including atypical protein assemblies as well as induced cell death. Neurodegeneration can be found in many different levels of neuronal circuitry ranging from molecular to systemic.

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